A servant church in the heart of the city

Lex orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi
Pending
His birthday is today, Sunday. He advocated US immigration reform, joined the American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, was a Red Cross chaplain during WWI, Professor of Pastoral Theology at Union Theological Seminary, Professor of Homiletics Theological Seminary, an editor of the Interpreter's Bible and the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, and served as priest in three Episcopal Churches. 

Who was he? Walter Russell Bowie (1882–1969), who wrote the text for Hymn 598, “Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st to earth” (1928) used in all three services. Bowie was known for his emphasis on the "social gospel."

The hymn tune, Mit Freuden zart, dated in The Hymnal 1529, 1547, and 1566. John Fenstermaker illustrates how the tune was improved on a YouTube video, Theology of Hymns - Episode 3 at 4 min 55 sec into the video. The structure of the rhyming text and the tune is unusual, as you'll see at the bottom right corner of the page: "87.87.887," indicating the number of syllables in each phrase. The double "8" in the last third of the hymn gives added weight to the somber call of the social gospel for us to finish the salvation begun on the Cross.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_RSSDnH0oc
 
 
 

Sunday, October 8: Pentecost 18 (Proper 22):
Voluntary: I’ll send this early next week
Entrance Hymn (10:15): #598: “Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st to earth”
Song of Praise:
(8:00): #598: “Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st to earth”
(10:15): S 280 (please print the music for this in the leaflet)
Psalm 80:7-14:
(8:00): spoken
(10:15): sung by the choir; chant by John Goss

Gospel Hymn: (10:15 only): #448: “O love, how deep, how broad, how high”
Offertory Anthem: Vinnea mea electa (Francis Poulenc)
Vinea mea electa, ego te plantavi: quomodo conversa es
in amaritudinem, ut me crucifigeres et Barrabam dimitteres?
My chosen vineyard, I planted you: how have you turned
into bitterness, so as to crucify me and free Barabbas?
“Holy, holy, holy Lord” (10:15 only):  S 125

Breaking of the Bread: (10:15 only): S 154
Communion Anthem: “Let thy blood in mercy poured” (Jeffrey H. Rickard)

Let thy blood in mercy poured,
let thy gracious body broken,
be to me, O gracious Lord,
of thy boundless love the token:

Thou didst die that I might live;
blessed Lord, thou cam'st to save me;
all that love of God could give
Jesus by his sorrows gave me

By the thorns that crowned thy brow,
by the spear wound and the nailing,
by the pain and death, I now
claim, O Christ, thy love unfailing.

Wilt thou own the gift I bring?
All my penitence I give thee;
thou art my exalted King,
of thy matchless love forgive me. Amen.

Communion Hymn:  #337: “And now, O Father, mindful of the love”
Sending Hymn: #495: “Hail, thou once despised Jesus!”
Voluntary: I’ll send this early next week

5:00 service:
Same service music as Pentecost 17
Alleluia verse: “The statutes of the Lord are just and rejoice / the heart* the commandment of the Lord is clear and give light / to the eyes.”
Offertory Hymn:  #598: “Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st to earth”
Sending Hymn: #495: “Hail, thou once despised Jesus!”



 

Sunday Oct 1

So many people make the beauty of our liturgy possible! For example, from last Sunday's Ministry Fair, here is an excerpt from material prepared by the Altar Guild, one of several groups regularly supporting our worship: 

"In the time of Jesus and after him, the young Christian church met in homes and meeting rooms to pray, to teach and learn, and to break bread together. 

"But there was a before -- providing food and wine, the plates and goblets to put them in, and setting the table before the women and men gathered. And there was an after -- collecting the leftover food and drink, cleaning the table, washing the plates, cups, and clothes left behind as the believers returned to their world.

"Today, in our glorious Cathedral, it is the Altar Guild who are the before and the after of our Sunday worship services, baptisms, weddings, and funerals, and after congregational and diocesan events centered in liturgy and communion." 



Sunday, September 24: 
Pentecost 16 (Proper 20):

Our lectionary readings remind us of God’s grace. From Exodus, we learn how God supplied the Israelites in the wilderness, and the Psalm cites the quails in the Exodus story. The Epistle from Philippians addresses the gift of the gospel, and the Gospel passage from Matthew is the parable of the generous landowner.

Appropriate to the lessons, the Gospel Hymn at 10:15 is #470: “There’s a wideness in God’s mercy,” with a text by prolific hymn writer Frederick William Faber (1814-1863), an Anglican who converted to the Roman Church. He was impressed with the hymns of the Wesleys and tried to emulate their “simplicity and intense fervor,” according to Hymnary.org. He was concerned that Catholic hymns of his time failed in their translations to “express Saxon thought and feelings.” Our Hymnal 1982 contains four of Faber’s hymns.

The composer, John Zundel (1815–1882) was Faber’s contemporary, but was born in Germany, studied in Russia, and was hired by famous abolitionist and Congregationalist clergyman Henry Ward Beecher to be music director and organist for Brooklyn’s Plymouth Church, where he served 28 years.

The great hymns enfolded into today’s Episcopal tradition are existential  testimonies from fellow seekers and discoverers, and this exquisitely simple hymn affirms God’s total embrace. 
-----------------

Voluntary: Andante sostenuto op. 70 no. 2 (Charles-Marie Widor)

Entrance Hymn (10:15): #414: “God, my King, thy might confessing”

Song of Praise:

(8:00):  #414: “God, my King, thy might confessing”

(10:15): S 280 (please print the music for this in the leaflet)

Psalm 145: 1-8:

(8:00): spoken 

(10:15): sung by the choir; chant by Thomas Atwood

Gospel Hymn: (10:15 only): #470: “There’s a wideness in God’s mercy”

Offertory Anthem: “O God, my King” (John Amner) 

O God my King, I will magnify thee and praise thy Name for ever and ever.

Great is the Lord and marvelous worthy to be praised; there is no end of his greatness.

The Lord is gracious and merciful, long-suffering and of great goodness.

My mouth shall speak the praises of the Lord, and let all flesh give thanks unto his holy Name for ever and ever. Amen. (Psalm 145:1,3,8,21)
 

“Holy, holy, holy Lord” (10:15 only):  S 125

Breaking of the Bread: (10:15 only): S 154

Communion Anthem: “Jesus Christ the Apple Tree” (Elizabeth Posten) 

The tree of life my soul hath seen
Laden with fruit and always green
The tree of life my soul hath seen
Laden with fruit and always green
The trees of nature fruitless be
Compared with Christ the applle tree

His beauty doth all things excel
By faith I know but ne'er can tell
His beauty doth all things excel
By faith I know but ne'er can tell
The glory which I now can see
In Jesus Christ the apple tree.

For happiness I long have sought
And pleasure dearly I have bought
For happiness I long have sought
And pleasure dearly I have bought
I missed of all but now I see
'Tis found in Christ the apple tree.

I'm weary with my former toil
Here I will sit and rest a while
I'm weary with my former toil
Here I will sit and rest a while
Under the shadow I will be
Of Jesus Christ the apple tree.

This fruit does make my soul to thrive
It keeps my dying faith alive
This fruit does make my soul to thrive
It keeps my dying faith alive
Which makes my soul in haste to be
With Jesus Christ the apple tree. 

                  (text by Richard Hutchins)

Communion Hymn:  #660: “O Master, let me walk with thee”

Sending Hymn: #655: “O Jesus, I have promised”

Voluntary: Praeludium in G major, BWV 568 (Johann Sebastian Bach)
 
 

5:00 service:

Same service music as Pentecost 15

Alleluia verse: “For the Lord is a / great God* and a great King over /all the earth.”

Offertory Hymn:  #470: “There’s a wideness in God’s mercy”

Sending Hymn: #655: “O Jesus, I have promised”
 
 


% Worship Committee note for the Digital Bulletin.

Hi, Melissa,
   Below is this week's Worship Committee note for the Digital Bulletin. Thank you.
Vern



For Sept 17 Digital Bulletin:

The Gospel for Sunday is Matthew 18:21-35, which includes the parable of the master who forgives a slave's debt, but the slave will not forgive the debt of a fellow slave. Appropriate to the Gospel theme, the 10:15 Offertory Anthem is “Remember not, Lord, our offenses." 

The text is by Thomas Cranmer (1489–1556), who produced the first Book of Common Prayer in 1549, using Lutheran sources, the Sarum (Salisbury) Rite from the 11th Century, and other writings. Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, made it possible for people to worship fully in the English tongue. After the Bible and Shakespeare, the BCP is the most frequent source of common quotations in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. A version of the anthem text appears in our 1979 BCP page 148, as part of the Great Litany.

Some time after baroque composer Henry Purcell (1659–95) was made Organist and Master of the Choristers for Westminster Abbey, he wrote “Remember not, Lord, our offenses" for a cappella mixed choir with two soprano parts. Purcell's continuing influence in our time includes, on one hand, the rock band, The Who, and on the other hand, Benjamin Britten, whose Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra is subtitled Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell. Purcell's feast day in the Episcopal Church is July 28. 
 

Sunday, September 17: Pentecost 15 (Proper 19):

Voluntary: (I will send this early next week)
Entrance Hymn (10:15): #1: “Father, we praise thee, now the night is over”

Song of Praise:
(8:00): #1: “Father, we praise thee, now the night is over”
(10:15): S 280 (please print the music for this in the leaflet)

Psalm 103: 1-14:
(8:00): spoken
(10:15): sung by the choir (chant by Kellow J. Pye)
Gospel Hymn: (10:15 only): #674: “Forgive our sins as we forgive”

Offertory Anthem: “Remember not, Lord, our offenses (Henry Purcell)
Remember not, Lord, our offences,
Nor th' offences of our forefathers;
Neither take thou vengeance of our sins,
But spare us, good Lord.
Spare thy people, whom thou has redeem'd
With thy most precious blood,
And be not angry with us for ever.
Spare us, good Lord. (text by Thomas Cranmer)

“Holy, holy, holy Lord” (10:15 only):  S 125
Breaking of the Bread: (10:15 only): S 154
Communion Anthem: “Lord, for thy tender mercy’s sake” (Richard Farrant)

Lord, for thy tender mercy's sake
lay not our sins to our charge,
but forgive that is past,
and give us grace to amend our sinful lives:
to decline from sin and incline to virtue,
that we may walk with a perfect heart,
before thee now and evermore.

Communion Hymn:  #325: “Let us break bread together on our knees”
Sending Hymn: #671: “Amazing grace! How sweet the sound”
Voluntary: I will send this early next week

5:00 Evensong:

Voluntary: Clair de Lune, op. 53 no. 5 (Louis Vierne)
Preces and Responses: Richard Ayleward
Hymn: #674: “Forgive our sins as we forgive”
Psalm 103: 1-14:
sung by the choir (chant by Kellow J. Pye)
Canticles: “Magnificat and Nunc dimittis in F” (George Dyson)
Anthem:  Verleih uns Frieden (Felix Mendelssohn) European Sacred Music, p. 208)

Verleih uns Frieden gnädiglich,
Herr Gott, zu unsern Zeiten.
Es ist doch ja kein andrer nicht,
der für uns könnte streiten,
denn du, unser Gott, alleine. (text by Martin Luther)

Give us peace mercifully,
Lord God, throughout our times!
For there is indeed no other 
that can fight for us,
but you, our God, alone.

Hymn: #671: “Amazing grace! How sweet the sound”
Voluntary: Improvisation (Matt Gender)
For the Evensong rota, please add Matt Gender, guest organist



For Sept 10 Digital Bulletin:
 

In Brian McLaren's book, A Generous Or+hodoxy [sic], this "leading figure in the emerging church movement" looks at strengths of various Christian groups. Here are a few lines from his chapter about our tradition:

"What keeps Anglicans together if they have so much diversity—High Church, Low Church, Anglo-Catholic, evangelical, charismatic, liberal, moderate, American, African, Asian, English? How do they function if their . . .  respect for Scripture and tradition and reason and experience doesn’t lead them to fast, easy agreements? 

"When conceptual agreement fails, many of them will tell you they are brought and kept together by liturgy (an orderly plan for public worship). But not just by words on a page. Rather, I believe, it is their deep appreciation for the deep beauty of liturgy that helps them make room for one another. Even if they disagree on what the liturgy means or requires doctrinally, they are charmed by its mysterious beauty and beautiful mystery, and that is often enough to keep them together long enough to share, evaluate, and integrate varied understandings. 

"In contrast to Christians who argue about the fine points of doctrine but show little taste for the beauty of truth, the Anglican way (as I have observed it) has been to begin with beauty, to focus on beauty, and to stay with it, believing that where beauty is, God is. These practices—or this method—are among the greatest gifts the Anglican community brings to the church at large . . . ."
 
 


For Sept 3 Digital Bulletin:

If angels pray the Psalms, they surely do so in Anglican chants. OK, this is wild hyperbole, but Anglican chants have become one of the foremost gifts of our heritage to the worship of God. Anglican chants are now in use in some Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Presbyterian, and other churches. When the choir chants on our behalf in our service of praise, we enfold another dimension of beauty as part of our gifts to God in rendering thanks for God's grace, even in times of trial. 

This Sunday the appointed passage is Psalm 26:1-8, with the choir at the 10:15 service using a chant by Thomas Attwood Walmisley (1814–1856), Professor of Music at Cambridge. Many of his chants remain in widespread practice. Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral is blessed to be able to continue this form of worship, originating in the late 16th Century, likely employed with the then-new Book of Common Prayer. By the 18th Century, this liturgical tradition was firmly established.

Anglican -- or "English" -- chant is a way to sing prose texts. While the Psalms, for example, have poetic content, most English translations of the Hebrew are not poetry with regular meter. Most hymn texts are poems with a regular rhythm, and rhyme as well, that easily lend themselves to musical form. The genius of the Anglican chant is to respect the natural pacing and the length syllables in prose while sounding them within a recurring melodic pattern by varying the number of syllables sung on a given pitch. 

In addition to many YouTube videos of inspiring Anglican chant, you'll find some hilarious spoofs, such as the "Anglican chant weather report" and the "Rules of Cricket - Anglican Psalm Chant"